Travel Max Guide
+977 9843688010 (Nepal)
+44 7473 101106 (UK)
Faq's
Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ's

Trekking is the most popular activity in Nepal, and travellers will be bombarded on the streets of Kathmandu and the trekking hub, Pokhara, with guides, organized tours and gear for sale or rent. The huge variety of options allows for people of many ages and capabilities to attempt a trek in the country. While you could spend a year planning an expedition to wild and lofty places that few would dare attempt, you could also arrive in Kathmandu with no plans and be on the trail in a matter of days. With eight of the top ten highest summits in the world and some of the most beautiful landscapes which are only reachable on foot, trekking in Nepal is one of the unique experiences.
The best seasons for trekking are the dry and warm seasons, March-June and September-November. The temperature is bearable and skies are usually clear in these seasons, although the skies are foggier and the rain begins in May-June. It is possible to trek out of season, but you have to be ready for the occasional rain and leeches along the way. During the monsoon season and winters, the treks are virtually emptier.
There are 33 mountain peaks in Nepal of 5,650-6,500m height classified as trekking peaks. Climbing permits for these peaks cost $350 USD for one to four members, an additional $40 USD each for the next four members and $25 USD each for the final four members. Trekking peaks require a qualified climbing guide, permits and deposits to cover camp waste disposal.
Few of the common accommodation options while trekking in Nepal are Tea Houses (Lodges) which can be found at various points on the trek. They offer dorm room accommodation and simple basic meals reflective of what the local people in the area eat. Although many tea houses and hotels in the hills and mountains are reasonably comfortable, some may not be comfortable, so it makes sense to bring a sleeping bag even for teahouse treks. Camping is another option for trekkers and it can be conducted almost anywhere in the country. Camping treks can be fully organized and supported with a team of guides, cooks, and porters to accompany you. Homestays in local villages can also be organized in few treks.
The treks in Nepal are suitable for a wide spectrum of experience and physical fitness. If you can walk uphill for a few hours each day, then you can find a suitable trek in Nepal. An easy trek with Nepali support (guide/porter) and teahouse accommodation is quite attainable for anyone who is reasonably fit. A longer trek, crossing high passes and into remote regions demands a higher degree of endurance. For Trekking Peaks, i.e. summiting a mountain of 5650-6500m, it is desirable to have some alpine climbing experience.
Please read up extensively on Altitude sickness. Be familiar with the symptoms and do not ignore them. Be sure to keep to a conservative ascent schedule and drink plenty of fluids. If you or anyone in your party begins to experience symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS), do not ascend any further, and if they do not improve, then descend to a lower altitude. Carry some diamox (acetazolamide) pills, easily found in pharmacies in Nepal. Diamox forces the kidneys to excrete bicarbonate in the urine, therefore making the blood more acidic, which stimulates breathing, increasing the amount of oxygen in the blood. But note that diamox is not an immediate fix for acute mountain sickness; it speeds up part of the acclimatization process which in turn helps to relieve symptoms. This may take up to a day or two, and requires waiting without any further rapid ascent. It is often advisable to descend if even mild acute mountain sickness is experienced. If serious sickness is encountered or symptoms of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) occur, descent with another trekker is A MUST. Please consult the pharmacist when purchasing Diamox and do your own research. One major thing to remember is that body requires large amounts of water at altitude to counteract sickness so be sure to drink more than you are used to!
Always carry a head torch/lamp, water, some food, and a mobile phone with helicopter evacuation number, local police station and nearby health post in case of emergencies.
Before the departures check that your travel insurance covers trekking activities and the conditions. Be aware that some insurance companies view even walking in the mountains as "mountaineering" and will not provide coverage. Most reputable trekking agencies will require proof of rescue insurance before you start on your trek. It would be very costly to pay a helicopter rescue at 5000 meters. Some insurance policies, in fact most, will not cover you over 4000m.
• Trek legally. If you trek independently, you are not allowed to take any staff by law. You need for this a Trekking Agency, the sole authorized to employ staff for foreign trekkers. Do not hire staff or "independent guides" through hotels, unless they have a Trekking Agent licence or offer this service through an affiliated Trekking Agent. • Please make sure you take all of your trash, including bottles and cans from goods consumed in restaurants, to the nearest dustbins. Pollution and lack of trash management in the villages on the treks - including trash-clogged rivers and mounds of discarded beer bottles.
The main essentials to bring are: • Sturdy and comfortable hiking boots, flip-flops • Sleeping bag (depending on your accommodation) and -20 degree Celsius for colder regions • Daypack, trekking bag pack, dry sack and camera bag • Few changes of clothes for the varying temperatures • For cold weather, hiking pants, thermals, gloves, neck warmer/scarf, beanie, a warm inner jacket and a windproof / waterproof outer jacket and down jacket are essential. • Water purification supplies, Reusable water bottle and CamelBak water bladder • Sunscreen, Hat, sunglasses, moisturizing skin cream and lip balm • Few snaks, granola bars • Hiking stick or two • Waterproof case, fabric bandages such as moleskin, a headlamp, altitude sickness and other medication • Camera and binoculars. • Hand sanitizers, toilet paper, band-aids, wet wipes • Extra batteries (solar chargers recommended) On the popular trekking routes, everyday supplies, such as toilet paper, soap, chocolate bars, and even basic hiking supplies can be purchased along the way, though prices rise dramatically as you go higher in elevation. Try to stock up lower down and buy locally-produced products such as fruit, biscuits etc. Maps are easy to find in Nepal. For the more difficult treks involving mountaineering, crampons and ice axes may be required. Simpler types of crampons, which attach to the shoe using a rubber ring, are easily obtainable in the Thamel neighborhood. These are variously known as spikes, micro spikes and chains.
Passports To enter Nepal, a passport valid for six months is required and tourist visa is required with currency restrictions for entry and exit is five thousand USD. Citizens of the following states (except officials and diplomatic passport holders) are required to apply for a visa prior to arrival in Nepal: • Afghanistan • Cameroon • Ethiopia • Ghana • Iraq • Liberia • Nigeria • Palestine • Somalia • Swaziland • Syria • Zimbabwe Nationals of SAARC member countries can receive a tourist visa free of charge for 30 days at no cost. Those countries are: • Afghanistan • Bangladesh • Bhutan • Maldives • Pakistan • Sri Lanka Since January 1 2016, nationals holding passports issued by China Peoples Republic of China (PROC) can have their visa fees waived if they are traveling as tourists. Those jurisdictions are: • China • Hong Kong • Macau Visa on Arrival: Immigration Office, TIA (Tribhuvan International Airport) under Department of Immigration has been facilitating tourists flying to Nepal by providing Visa on Arrival. 'On Arrival' visa procedure is very quick and simple. First Step: Fill in 'Arrival Card’ Fill in Online ‘Tourist Visa’ form (you can fill it up prior to your arrival visiting official website of Department of Immigration / fill it up using Kiosk machines upon your arrival at the airport). If you fill it from the website, you will get submission Receipt with barcode, please print it out and bring it along for acquiring visa. It works for fifteen days and becomes invalid then after. If so, you will have to fill it up again. Second Step: Make payment at the bank according to your visa requirement (15/30/90 Days). Get the receipt. While you can use different modes of payments (at visa fees collection counter), we advise you to carry some cash to be on the safe side. On Arrival Visa Fee 15 Days – 25 USD 30 Days – 40 USD 90 Days – 100 USD Third Step: Proceed to the Immigration Desk with your online form, payment receipts and your passport. Hand in your documents to immigration officer for visa processing. Gratis (Free) Visa • For first visit in one visa year (January to December) , gratis visa for 30 days is available only for nationals of South Asian countries like Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. However, visa can be extended from the Immigration Department on payment of visa fee as specified above. • Indian nationals do not require visa to enter into Nepal
Police check points are numerous and unavoidable and park officers can check your permits at any time, with a fine of double the normal cost if you are caught without the proper permits. Do not try to bribe officers or police personnel; it might get you in more trouble than you think. Most of the time there will be two or 3 permits, one will belong to conservation area or national park, another will be Trekkers Information Management System (TIMS) Card and the last one is restricted area entry permit. You will need one or two or all of the permits mentioned above. 1. DOLPA DISTRICT For Upper Dolpa: The first 10 days: USD$ 500 per person After 10 days: USD$ 50 per day person or equivalent foreign currency. For Lower Dolpo: Per week per person: US$ 10 or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 2. MUSTANG DISTRICT Upper Mustang: The first 10 days: USD$ 500 per person After 10 days: USD$ 50 per day per person, or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 3. GORKHA DISTRICT a. Manaslu Region: From September to November: USD$ 70 per week per person After 7 days: USD$ 10 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. From December to August: USD$ 50 per week per person After 7 days: USD$ 7 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. b. Areas of Chhekampar and Chunchet VDC (Sirdibas-Lokpa-Chumling-Chhekampar -Nile-Chhule Area) From September to November per person: USD$ 35 for first 8 days From December to August per person: USD$ 25 for first 8 days or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 4. MUGU DISTRICT Areas of Mugu, Dolpo, Pulu and Bhangri For the first 7 days: USD$90 per person After 7 days: USD$ 15 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 5. MANANG DISTRICT Areas of Nar and Phu From September to November: USD$ 90 per week per person December to August: USD$ 75 per week per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 6. DOLAKHA DISTRICT Gaurishankar and Lamabagar Per week per person: USD$ 10 or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 7. RASUWA DISTRICT Thuman and Timure Per week per person: USD$ 10 or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 8. HUMLA DISTRICT Simikot and Yari (Areas of Limi and Muchu village Development Committee, and area way to Tibet via Tangekhola of Darma Village Development committee) For the first 7 days: USD$ 50 per person After 7 days: USD$7 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 9. SANKHUWASABHA Areas of Kimathanka, Chepuwa,Hatiya and Pawakhola VDCs For the first four weeks: USD$ 10 per person per week After four weeks: USD$20 per person per week or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 10. TAPLEJUNG DISTRICT Kanchanjanga Region (Areas of Olangchung Gola, Lelep, Papung and Yamphudin VDCs) Per week per person: USD$ 10 or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 11. BAJHANG DISTRICT (Areas of Kanda, Saipal and Dhuli) For the first 7 days: USD$ 90 per person After seven days: USD$ 15 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. 12. DARCHULA DISTRICT (Areas of Byas VDC) For the first 7 days: US$ 90 per person After 7 days: USD$ 15 per day per person or equivalent convertible foreign currency. Note: References from http://www.taan.org.np/pages/trekking-permit-fees. Please check for confirmation.
February, March, April, May, June, September, October, and November are typically for trekking in Nepal.
Yes, it will operate on the day it is scheduled, except in the event that is beyond our control, such as political issues and natural disaster that will create undesirable travel conditions.
During trekking, you will spend your night in a tea house. The tea house is a lodge or a guest house. The tea house is an old name for a lodge because trekkers and climbers gave this name 40 years ago, because it used to sell only tea then. Now they also sell meals as well as provide bedrooms for the trekkers and climbers. The old name tea house is still used by the trekking agencies in Nepal. Hence, the name tea house trek. Tea house differs from village to village where you are going to spend your night. Some have attached bathrooms as well as running hot water facility, while others have only basic facilities, that is, you have to share a toilet and a bathroom with others. This is so because they are located in a high altitude and the remotest area. Some provide dormitory style accommodation, but they also provide you a bed, a pillow, a blanket, and a bed sheet still, you must have your own sleeping bag. Homestay trek is different from a tea house trek because, in the former, you will spend your night in a home and eat meals with the family members. It is just like staying in your own home.
When you decide to trek, trek with a company that likes to take your responsibility, and that has licensed and experienced trekking guide. Please do not throw bottles in the river while you are trekking in a remote place.
The main essentials are:
  • Sturdy and comfortable hiking boots, flip-flops
  • Sleeping bag (depending on your accommodation) and -20 degree Celsius for colder regions
  • Daypack, trekking bag pack, dry sack and camera bag
  • Few changes of clothes for the varying temperatures
  • For cold weather, hiking pants, thermals, gloves, neck warmer/scarf, beanie, a warm inner jacket and a windproof / waterproof outer jacket and down jacket are essential.
  • Water purification supplies, Reusable water bottle and CamelBak water bladder
  • Sunscreen, Hat, sunglasses, moisturizing skin cream and lip balm
  • Few snacks, granola bars
  • Hiking stick or two
  • Waterproof case, fabric bandages such as moleskin, a headlamp, altitude sickness and other medication
  • Camera and binoculars
  • Hand sanitizers, toilet paper
  • Extra batteries (solar chargers recommended). On the popular trekking routes, everyday supplies, such as toilet paper, soap, chocolate bars, and even basic hiking supplies can be purchased along the way, though prices rises dramatically as you go higher elevation. Maps are easy to find in Nepal. For the more difficult treks involving mountaineering, crampons and ice axe are required. They are easily available in Thamel in Kathmandu.
It is an opportunity to combine challenging mountain trail, unique culture and stunning mountains that are famous in the world. It is also an opportunity to trek to the Everest Base Camp Trek and the Annapurna Base Camp, and other famous treks of Nepal are Langtang Trek, Manaslu Trek, Kanchenjunga Trek, and so on. It is also overcoming Altitude Mountain Sickness.
It is a sickness caused due to lack of oxygen at an altitude of 2000 m plus. It affects some trekkers easily, but to some, it does not. Out of 10, one is affected by Altitude Mountain Sickness. It can be life-threatening. Travel Insurance is a must.
  • Descend to a lower altitude
  • Drink a lot of water
  • Don't go up until symptoms go down
  • Eat garlic
  • Take Diamox

Affiliation

Affiliation

We Accept

We accept

Recommended by

TripAdvisor
Trusted Partner